Annenberg School of Nursing graduates second class from a unique program

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BY MY DAILY FIND STAFF

While the healthcare industry bemoans a severe nursing shortage and sociologists warn of a growing health crisis amidst an aging population, the Los Angeles Jewish Home has continued to meet that challenge with its second graduating class of the Annenberg School of Nursing.  Launched in 2007 and made possible through a grant from the Annenberg Foundation, the Los Angeles Jewish Home is one of the only multi-level senior living facilities in the country to offer a school of nursing (non-denominational) on its campus.

BRIGHT LIGHTS -- Their future bright with opportunities, graduates of the Jewish Home’s Annenberg School of Nursing Class of 2009 at ceremony at Home’s Reseda campus (left to right Janice Trebago, Connie Brooker and Norma De Cid) light candles in memory of the Lady with the Lamp, Florence Nightingale, mother of modern nursing.

BRIGHT LIGHTS -- Their future bright with opportunities, graduates of the Jewish Home’s Annenberg School of Nursing Class of 2009 at ceremony at Home’s Reseda campus (left to right Janice Trebago, Connie Brooker and Norma De Cid) light candles in memory of the Lady with the Lamp, Florence Nightingale, mother of modern nursing.

The 2009 class of graduates is a multi-cultural group from countries throughout the world, with each graduate seizing the opportunity to fulfill their dreams and build a better life for themselves and their families through nursing.

“Many of these students have overcome personal challenges and obstacles to take this giant step,” said Annenberg Program Director Marie Fagan. “We’re incredibly proud of their determination and spirit and know that they will all make exceptional nurses wherever their futures may lead.”

The Annenberg School of Nursing offers a full-time program that prepares students to pass the state-required exam for licensure as vocational nurses. The intensive program engages students 40 hours per week in the classroom or at clinical sites resulting in a total of 639 hours of classroom instruction and 1,041 hours of clinical training at local hospitals in order to qualify for graduation.

To help encourage students to pursue a career in nursing, the Home offers financial incentives for its students who qualify, which helps offset the $19,000 program cost. Through the generous gifts from the Annenberg Foundation, the UniHealth Foundation and private donors, students can receive a $10,000 no-interest loan which is forgiven if they take a nursing job at the Home upon graduation and stay for at least two years.  Also available is no-interest loan assistance through the L.A. Jewish Free Loan Program, sponsored in part by Jewish Home donor Joyce Brandman.

Addressing her classmates, valedictorian and Florence Nightingale award winner Jennifer Imbag said,  “In spite of our diversities, we have come together, reaching our goal of becoming the knowledgeable and capable graduate students we are today. Moreover, let us be reminded that a career in nursing in not just about doing our job as a nurse and having a stable job, it is about running that extra mile to make a huge difference in someone’s life. This is what makes nursing a worthy and truly rewarding career.”

Further information regarding the Home can be found online at www.jha.org or by calling 818-757-4407.

About Karen Young

Karen Young is the founder of My Daily Find.